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Posts published by “Claire Kraemer”

Wool E. Bull, ready to play

Wool E. Bull forgets his mask as he gallops out of Durham Bulls Athletic Park. He quickly realizes his mistake and returns with it looped over his furry ears. It is giant and looks more like a diaper strapped across his snout than a mask. It is adorned with baseballs. 

As his team prepares for a new season after being shut down for the pandemic, the 6-foot tall, furry bull – proclaimed to be “The Greatest Mascot in the World” – is making some adjustments as he gears up for Opening Day on May 11. The team says he has been vaccinated.

I learn this from talking with Emily Almond, the director of promotions for the Bulls and Wool E.’s translator. “I speak bull,” she explains. 

I feel a giddy nervousness in front of the fluffy bull that stands on two feet outside the ballpark. Even without a bull translator, I would’ve felt his excitement for the upcoming season. As we begin to talk, fans honk at him. He jokingly points to me, realizes the commotion is for him, and shrugs off the attention. A humble bull. 

The mask isn’t his only adjustment this season. In past years, Wool E. frolicked with players and fans alike. He danced in foul territory, stole hats from coaches, spun along the warning track in his go-cart, played tug of war with fans, or led the “running of the bulls,” when kids chased him and then tackled him before he reached safety.

This year, Wool E. will be banned from the field and will have to mix with fans in the stands. How close he gets will depend on the fans. Almond says, “We are comfortable with whatever our customers are comfortable with.” 

Wool E. Bull, Photo by Sho Hatakeyama – The 9th Street Journal

Fans can choose to hug Wool E, or stand at a distance of six feet. “You have to choose to go see him, rather than him interacting with you,” she says. 

The Bulls are working to make sure they follow the latest restrictions from the city, state and Major League Baseball. “It’s really about just working with the guidelines that we have right now, just trying to modify and still make it a great fan experience while still being safe,” she says.

She assures me that the pandemic hasn’t altered his personality. 

“We are still planning on having a whole bunch of Wool E. antics,” Almond explains, “Obviously he hasn’t changed much.” As she says this, we look over to find Wool E. crawling towards a camera, looking more like a cat than a bull.

With no games in the last year, Wool E. made virtual appearances at kids’ story-times and P.E. classes (since he can’t talk, no one on Zoom has to remind him to unmute himself) as well as private, in-person events. He also helped deliver meals to hospital workers.

With a job that requires energy and strength for constant dancing and hugging, Wool E. finds himself battling some of his lazier quarantine habits. “We don’t need an out of shape Wool E. for the season,” Almond says. But he appears fit.  Wool E. flexes his muscles for the camera as two fans walk by. Almond sighs, clearly used to this behavior and says, “C’mon now, don’t get too full of yourself.”

Wool E. is still planning on having his annual birthday celebration at the game May 23, an event when even the Tar Heel and Blue Devil set aside their differences. 

Almond and Wool E. are trying to come up with new gags that are appropriate for the unusual summer of transition. They have just come from a two and a half hour brainstorming session to dream up new ideas to entertain fans. They’re considering lots of different bits, although “within reason,” Almond assures, “He’s not allowed to eat the grass during the game.”

In photo at top:  After last year’s season was canceled, Wool E. Bull is ready for baseball – even though he’ll be confined to the stands. Photo by Sho Hatakeyama – The 9th Street Journal

Death of birds blamed on bird feeders and salmonellosis

Bird-watchers in North Carolina have gotten alarmed in the last few weeks as dead or dying birds began appearing in their backyards. 

Biologists and people in the birdseed business say the deaths are not unusual, but that people are just more aware of them because of an increase in backyard bird feeders. They say homeowners can take a few simple steps to reduce the spread of the disease that has been killing the birds – and now has begun to sicken people. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week that 19 people in eight states had become ill with salmonella linked to songbirds. Eight have been hospitalized. No people have been sickened in North Carolina, but bird lovers have been urged to be cautious. 

This kind of outbreak happens from time to time. 

“Well first, let me tell you that salmonellosis is a common disease,” said Jeanne Mauney, the owner of Wild Birds Unlimited in Durham. “This is not a sudden outbreak. It’s not a COVID event. This is normal Pine Siskin disease.”

Falyn Owens, a wildlife biologist from the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, says the salmonellosis that infects birds is commonly known as salmonella and “it’s the reason why we always clean chicken before we cook it and eat it.” 

Salmonellosis is passed by Pine Siskins, small songbirds. CDC photo

Salmonella is a common pathogen passed between Pine Siskins, a small songbird that migrates to the South from Canada every three to four years. This year, North Carolina has seen an influx in these kinds of finches because Canada did not have a sufficient amount of seed to feed their flocks, causing what Mauney calls “an irruptive year.”

Owens suspects at least some of the increase of seeing dead or dying birds is due to people buying bird feeders during quarantine. People were searching for new ways to entertain themselves and are now concerned when they see sick, fluffy birds in their yards. 

This also means that new bird feeder owners are unaware of the risks that run when interacting with wild animals, including the risk of pathogen transmission from bird to human.

One of the first steps to preventing the increase of dying birds is taking bird feeders down, although that can be an unpopular move within the bird-watching community. Feeders act as the perfect origin for a large outbreak. 

“It’s basically a feeding trough where multiple animals are eating off of, back to back,” said Owens, “You can imagine if you had a whole cafeteria worth of people without washing it in between, there’s a risk of contamination.”

Pine Siskins are also social birds. They travel in big flocks to bird feeders where there are more opportunities to spread pathogens to each other. 

After the initial break from bird feeders, Wild Birds Unlimited suggests more frequent cleaning with a bleach solution (1 part bleach, 9 parts water). While cleaning, it is necessary that people are extremely careful. Do not touch the feeders with your bare hands, and rinse your hands vigorously after cleaning. Transmission occurs when people touch their mouth after contact with the disease, whether directly with a bird, the seed, or a feeder. 

Mauney said to clean feeders often. “While normally we tell you to clean it monthly, we are saying to do it weekly.” 

Another option: plants instead of bird feeders. 

Native plants like black-eyed susans and purple coneflowers can be found at most nurseries and are a natural food source for songbirds. While the upfront cost is greater than purchasing a bird feeder, native plants require less upkeep and there are no subsequent purchases of bird seed to continue attracting birds. These plants allow for bird-watchers to continue observing from their homes, but limit the spread of salmonellosis.

“I think the best, most ecological decision,” Owens said, “is to switch away from bird feeders at all and move to a more natural way of attracting birds into your yard to watch them and to enjoy them and give them food and shelter is by providing food to them through native plants.”

Durham residents’ biggest gripe? Lousy streets

In 2020, a turbulent year of disease and conversations of racial equity and police violence, residents of Durham were most unhappy with the city streets. 

In the annual survey of city residents, road maintenance had the highest rating of dissatisfaction (45% were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied), higher than the public schools (34%) and police protection, which scored remarkably well, with 53% satisfied or very satisfied.    

Residents also chose city streets third to receive the “Most Emphasis from City and County Leaders over the Next Two Years,” behind police protection and public schools.

The city conducts the survey to get feedback on its services as well as those offered by the county and Durham Public Schools. The city’s news release about the survey was quite cheery (“Durham Satisfaction Survey Shows Residents Pleased with Employee Service During COVID-19 Pandemic”), but we decided to focus on the persistent grumpiness about the roads. 

“We get this every year,” Mayor Steve Schewel said about the road complaints. “It always amazes me.” 

Schewel noted that the roads that receive the most complaints aren’t ones that the city maintains.

He said key streets in Durham such as Hillsborough Road, Cameron Boulevard, and Fayetteville Street aren’t managed or maintained by the city itself. They are actually state-owned and maintained. 

One problem is money. He said that state maintenance relies on the state gas tax, but it can’t keep up with the changing fleet on the roads.

“People have been driving less, driving hybrid vehicles, and driving more fuel efficient cars,”  said Schewel, whose wife drives a Prius. “So gas tax collections have really gone down. The state has been strapped for cash for road maintenance.” 

City residents, probably unaware of nuances of road ownership and budgeting, just want better streets. When asked which government service should receive the more funding, 47% of survey recipients said street maintenance.

Schewel said it’s a constant challenge to balance the needs with available revenue. “Part of it is that we need to continue to spend local money on street paving,” he said, “but the state also needs to do its job on thoroughfares which they tend to own.”

But don’t be surprised if next year’s survey is very similar. Said Schewel, “We are never quite where we want to be on street paving.” 

In photo above: Drivers have to dodge large potholes on Erwin Road between Cameron Boulevard and Morreene Road. Photo by Sho Hatakeyama | The 9th Street Journal