Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published by “Dryden Quigley”

From gin to clean hands: how a Durham distillery adapted to the pandemic

A few months ago, Durham’s Mystic Farm & Distillery decided to expand beyond its well-known line of gin and bourbon liqueur and make a completely new product: hand sanitizer.

When Jonathan Blitz’s partner Michael Sinclair first came to him with the idea, Blitz thought it would be a distraction to their whiskey production. Now, he is glad he went along. “It’s turned out to be an absolutely enormous business… it’s given us a new lifeline.”

Mystic has been distilling gin, whiskey bourbon, and bourbon liqueur since 2013, and added sanitizer at the start of the coronavirus pandemic. At first, the company sold to individuals, with so much demand that it backed up traffic down the street.  

“It was awesome,” said Sinclair.

The business has now shifted from individuals to larger contracts, including one from Duke University. 

Duke needed a dependable supplier after experiencing backorders with its usual vendors. “We had to find a plan B,” said John Noonan, Duke’s vice president of facilities. 

Mystic turned out to be that plan B. The company said it could meet Duke’s huge demand.

That demand has gone up because the number of hand sanitizers on campus has increased from 1,000 to about 1,700 to accommodate the return of students to campus. “When you get thousands of students and faculty who are taking four or more shots of hand sanitizer a day, it adds up,” Noonan said. 

Duke also is taking steps to ensure the sanitizing stations are environmentally friendly – refilling the bottles instead of replacing them.

What do the processes of making hand sanitizer and alcohol have in common? Not much. But the equipment to produce it is similar, which is why Mystic and other distilleries have gotten in the business. 

The equipment Mystic uses was bought from a pharmaceutical plant auction and then adapted to distill alcohol. This same equipment has now come full circle, being used to make medical-grade hand sanitizer.

You might think that alcohol from the whiskey and gin might somehow be used in the hand sanitizer. But they are different products. It is more efficient to buy the base alcohol in bulk for the sanitizer. 

Blitz says, “One of the reasons we’ve been able to get contracts from the large academic medical centers is that we are producing a high quality product and keeping that quality high. It’s not cheap or easy, but it has to be done.”

Blitz predicts they’ll be making the new product for a long time. “This generation for the next 15 to 20 years is going to use a lot of hand sanitizer.” Mystic is continuing to look at expansion options into over the counter drug opportunities now that they have the ingredients and equipment.

Blitz says hand sanitizer now outsells their spirits, but what matters is that the company is thriving. “We’ve been able to keep all our employees, which is what success means to me.”

Staff writer Dryden Quigley can be reached at dryden.quigley@duke.edu

In photo above: Mystic now sells hand sanitizer in a variety of sizes. Photo by Henry Haggart | The 9th Street Journal

Duke germ doctor putting a microscope on COVID-19

When the NFL needed help to stop the spread of the MRSA bacteria in 2013, the league called Dr. Deverick Anderson, a Duke infectious disease specialist, who established new locker room protocols and disinfection routines. Now, Anderson is tackling a bigger problem, helping health care workers combat the spread of the coronavirus.

Anderson, the director of the Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Prevention Program, said his primary concern is making sure that health workers who work with patients who have the virus don’t end up sick themselves. 

Deverick Anderson (Duke University photo)

Anderson received his undergraduate degree from University of North Carolina and later “stumbled down the path” of infection prevention while at the Duke School of Medicine, where he knew he wanted a specialty that focused on the body as a whole, rather than a single organ. He liked focusing on infections because they typically have a cure. He liked the idea of identifying and then eliminating a problem, which led him to infection prevention. 

His research on infection prevention has earned him grants to study infection control in community hospitals, multi-drug resistant organisms, and device-related infections. He led a study that compared four types of hospital cleaning protocols and found those that utilize ultraviolet machines are the most effective. In April, he studied the role of chest imaging in patients with the coronavirus. 

Doctors who have worked with him describe him as unflappable and a great mentor. 

“He’s got a remarkable ability not to show stress and to be fun to be around and work with, regardless of how the day or week is going,” said Dr. Arthur Baker, a Duke assistant professor of medicine who worked with Anderson on the early detection of infection outbreaks in surgical sites. “I think that combination of things has really made him a fantastic mentor for me.” 

Duke Assistant Professor of Medicine Dr. Sonali Advani, who recently published an article with Dr. Anderson titled “Universal masking in hospitals in the COVID19 era,” said, “I left a very good position at Yale to come here just to be mentored by him.” She spoke of how caring he is, setting aside 10 minutes at the end of each mentor session to discuss families, house remodeling, and other things outside of work.

He is nationally known and has been quoted by National Public Radio, The New York Times and The Washington Post. 

So what does the germ doctor advise about the coronavirus? 

He says the prevention measures you’ve heard about are still a good recipe: wearing face masks, practicing social distancing, and frequent hand washing. “I think it’s safe to say that all those together are certainly going to be much more effective than one of them individually,” he said. 

Along with that trifecta of things to protect yourself, Anderson also has a simple mindset for society’s overall approach for the virus: “It is all for one and one for all,” he said. “You’re not just wearing a mask for yourself. You’re wearing a mask for others in your community as well.”

He says you’re more likely to get the virus from another person than from picking it up from a surface. “It’s not a 50 one way and 50 the other. It’s probably much more weighted towards person-to-person.” So should we still be wiping everything down? He says that’s a good precaution, but in-person contact is the most likely way to get the virus.

As a consultant for the NFL, he feels the league has a good foundation for preventing the spread of infection. But the league needs to continue to build on that approach in this new age of the coronavirus. 

He says professional sports teams need to be asking themselves the same question as other businesses: “How can you be innovative about keeping people apart? How can you make sure that people wash their hands routinely or make it easy to do what’s right? And how can you get them to wear a mask? All of those same interventions are going to be useful in athletic training facilities as well.”

As lockdown regulations are loosened, it can be difficult to decide which situations are safe and which are not. Although Anderson can’t tell you which situations are worth the risk, he says, “In the end all of this is about risk-benefit. There is no such thing as a zero risk scenario in our society right now until there is an effective vaccine. . .It is a personal decision about what is considered to be an acceptable risk or the potential benefit that might be reaped.”